What Can Growing Pains Be Mistaken For?

Do growing pains mean a growth spurt?

Despite the name “growing pains,” there is no firm evidence that growing pains are linked to growth spurts.

Instead, growing pains may simply be muscle aches due to intense childhood activities that can wear your child’s muscles out.

These activities include running, jumping, and climbing..

Can I get growing pains at 17?

Boys and girls are equally affected. Some young people may continue to experience growing pains into their early adolescence or teenage years. Pain may be experienced in the legs – often the calf, front of thigh or behind the knees – and is often worse in the afternoon or evening.

Can you get growing pains at 15?

For girls, this is usually around ages 14 or 15. For boys, it’s usually by age 16. However, you can continue to have symptoms that resemble growing pains into adulthood.

What are aching legs a symptom of?

Most leg pain results from wear and tear, overuse, or injuries in joints or bones or in muscles, ligaments, tendons or other soft tissues. Some types of leg pain can be traced to problems in your lower spine. Leg pain can also be caused by blood clots, varicose veins or poor circulation.

Can Growing Pains be something else?

Growing pains can also turn out to be bone tumors, both benign and malignant. “Severe bone pain at night can be associated with a form of benign tumor called an osteoid osteoma, but can also occur with serious bone tumors.

What does a growth spurt feel like?

Increased hunger and sleeping are signs of a growth spurt. Increased hunger and sleeping are signs of a growth spurt. TRUE. Make sure your child is eating well and getting enough sleep during major times of growth.

What helps with growing pains?

Lifestyle and home remediesRub your child’s legs. Children often respond to gentle massage. … Use a heating pad. Heat can help soothe sore muscles. … Try a pain reliever. Offer your child ibuprofen (Advil, Children’s Motrin, others) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). … Stretching exercises.Aug 13, 2019

Can dehydration cause leg pain?

Dehydration is one of the most common causes of leg cramps. A cramp is an involuntary contraction of a muscle. The fluids in your body allow your muscles to relax, but—when those muscles are dehydrated—they get irritable and prone to cramping.

Why do I have growing pains but I’m not growing?

Despite the name, growth does not cause growing pains. In fact, medical experts have not yet identified a definitive cause of growing pains. Sometimes, the pain may go away with rest and proper hydration. In other instances, the pain may signal an underlying medical condition that requires treatment.

When should I worry about growing pains?

Pain accompanied by fever, a rash or loss of appetite should prompt an immediate visit to the child’s doctor. At Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), we’ve seen children with swollen joints and morning stiffness who were told they had growing pains, while they were getting progressively worse over weeks or even months.

Why do my daughters legs hurt?

Growing pains are a common cause of leg pain in children. These pains are muscle aches that can occur in the thighs, behind the knees, or the calves. Other possible causes of leg pain that may be more serious can include juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), lupus, Lyme disease, and leukemia.

Can growing pains make a child cry?

“Classic ‘growing pains’ occur in small children,” says Dr. Onel, who describes a typical scenario: “A child goes to bed and wakes up an hour or so later crying because of pain in their legs. They may ask to have the area rubbed to make it feel better; eventually the child goes back to sleep.

Can growing pains happen during the day?

Growing pains never occur during the daytime. No matter how severe the pain at night, children with growing pains are always fine the next morning. Any child with pain when they wake up in the morning or pain during the day requires a careful medical evaluation.

Can a child have growing pains in their back?

Growing pains in back It could be poor posture or muscle strain, but it may also be a sign of a more serious underlying disorder, especially if the pain lasts for more than a few days or gets progressively worse. See your doctor if that is the case.